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Targaprimir-96 successfully targets breast cancer RNA

Posted: 10 May 2016 | Victoria White, Digital Content Producer | 2 comments

Scientists have designed a drug candidate, Targaprimir-96, that decreases the growth of tumour cells in animal models of triple negative breast cancer…

Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have designed a drug candidate that decreases the growth of tumour cells in animal models of triple negative breast cancer.

“This is the first example of taking a genetic sequence and designing a drug candidate that works effectively in an animal model against triple negative breast cancer,” said TSRI Professor Matthew Disney. “The study represents a clear breakthrough in precision medicine, as this molecule only kills the cancer cells that express the cancer-causing gene—not healthy cells. These studies may transform the way the lead drugs are identified—by using the genetic makeup of a disease.”

The study demonstrates that the Disney lab’s compound, known as Targaprimir-96, triggers breast cancer cells to kill themselves via programmed cell death by precisely targeting a specific RNA that ignites the cancer.

While the goal of precision medicine is to identify drugs that selectively affect disease-causing biomolecules, the process has typically involved time-consuming and expensive high-throughput screens to test millions of potential drug candidates to identify those few that affect the target of interest. Disney’s approach eliminates these screens.

Targeting microRNA-96

The new study uses the lab’s computational approach called Inforna, which focuses on developing designer compounds that bind to RNA folds, particularly microRNAs. microRNA-96, which was the target of the new study, promotes cancer by discouraging programmed cell death, which can rid the body of cells that grow out of control.

The drug candidate was tested in animal models over a 21-day course of treatment. Results showed decreased production of microRNA-96 and increased programmed cell death, significantly reducing tumour growth. Since targaprimir-96 was highly selective in its targeting, healthy cells were unaffected.

In contrast, Disney noted, a typical cancer therapeutic targets and kills cells indiscriminately, often leading to side effects that can make these drugs difficult for patients to tolerate.

“In the future we hope to apply this strategy to target other disease-causing RNAs, which range from incurable cancers to important viral pathogens such as Zika and Ebola,” added Research Associate Sai Pradeep Velagapudi, the first author of the study and a member of the Disney lab.

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2 responses to “Targaprimir-96 successfully targets breast cancer RNA”

  1. Fonda Goodwin says:

    I am following your info on this bad cancer. Someone dear to me has triple neg inflammatory. She is married,has a 1st and 3rd grader. So upbeat and positive. We are praying for a miracle. Thank you for all you are doing.

  2. M. Bukhari says:

    My sister has triple negative breast cancer.she is currently undergoing chemo to be followed by radiotherapy
    When do think this drug will be in the market

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