article

Why do we have no effective treatments for osteoarthritis?

Posted: 20 April 2019 | | No comments yet

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a painful and debilitating disease of articular joints.1,2 Its clinical prevalence is as high as 21.6 percent of the population in the United States,3 which constitutes direct health costs of over 80 billion US dollars annually.4

Due to the increasing mean age of the global population, it is believed that OA will become the fourth leading cause of disability worldwide by 2020.5 Symptoms vary from moderate pain to disability – which in turn can lead to low mood and depression6 – as well as progressive cartilage loss, subchondral bone thickening, osteophyte formation and joint space narrowing.2 Growing evidence implicates the impairment of several physiological mechanisms in the pathogenesis of OA,7-9 and despite these recent advances in understanding the pathogenesis of OA thus far, they have failed to deliver any disease-modifying therapeutics.











To read this article in full, please complete the form below. By clicking submit you confirm that you accept our terms and conditions and privacy policy.


*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

This content is provided to you for free thanks to the kind support of our sponsor: Liverpool University

Related conditions

Related organisations

Send this to a friend