podcast

Episode 7 – Cell line development with Dr Natasa Skoko, ICGEB & Dr Hugh Graham, MacroGenics

Posted: 12 April 2022 | | No comments yet

Tune in to this podcast to hear industry experts discuss cell line monoclonality and the emerging methods that can support clonal origin assurance.

This episode of Drug Target Review‘s podcast, in associate with Molecular Devices, covers cell line development and the assurance of monoclonality in cell lines. Featuring expert speakers Dr Natasa Skoko, Group Leader of the Biotechnology Development Unit at the International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology and Dr Hugh Graham, Director of Cell Culture Sciences at MacroGenics.

The expert speakers discuss traditional cell line development workflows and the technologies that can aid in monoclonal assurance. 

Key learning points:

  • Challenges in traditional cell line development workflows 
  • How automation can aid bioprocessing scientists 
  • The emerging technologies that can enable monoclonal assurance
  • The role of regulation and its impact on cell line development processes and methods
  • Where cell line development processes are headed in the future

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Natasa SkokoDr Natasa Skoko is a Group Leader of the BDU at ICGEB and her current interest is focused on development of biosimilars of Trastuzumab, Certolizumab pegol and Liraglutide. She works in close collaboration with the industrial sector by co-ordinating the transfer of know-how for the production of biosimilars to industry with aim to increase local pharmaceutical industries capacities in emerging markets. 

Hugh GrahamDr Hugh Graham is the Director, Cell Culture Sciences at MacroGenics Inc in Rockville, Maryland where he and his team develop the upstream processes for a broad pipeline of antibody-based therapeutics. His experience includes small biotechs and large pharma companies and has helped develop, launch and manufacture several commercial biologics.